Oblivious to impact

PUBLISHED: 12:26 04 January 2008 | UPDATED: 08:18 02 June 2010

RESPONDING to A J Elmer et al, and Alan Sibley, (letters Dec 07), who voiced their views on the impact of industrial wind turbines on rural Fenland, both say they regard these developments as works of art and modern windmills . A pile of rubble or weld

RESPONDING to A J Elmer et al, and Alan Sibley, (letters Dec 07), who voiced their views on the impact of industrial wind turbines on rural Fenland, both say they regard these developments as "works of art" and "modern windmills".

A pile of rubble or welded scrap metal maybe viewed by some eccentrics as "works of art" while others would see what is before them, a pile of rubble and welded scrap metal.

It seems that separating fact from fiction or fantasy may be a problem for some folk.

Mr Sibley views wind turbines as "modern windmills", regardless of the fact that they mill nothing and tower 300 feet above traditional windmills.

Windmill sails are replaced by turbine blades that encompass a jumbo 747 jet, all of this is supported by toxic manufacturing, and polluting concrete access roads and groundworks that create massive disturbance to the countryside.

Both Mr Sibley and AJ Elmer seem oblivious to the massive scale and impact of such developments on rural sites, so let me enlighten them on what is so obvious to others.

The traditional windmill is about 60-70 feet high and constructed of brick or timber. Its function is to mill flower or lift water, at such a workable size it can be converted into a home.

The wind turbine in construction and installation is highly polluting, its function is to try to generate electricity. It fails miserably. However, the generation of subsidies is far more successful. The turbine cannot be converted into a home, but maybe used as a massive countryside (helter skelter with full lighting) some time in the not to distant future.

Mr Sibley is right to suggest that a turbine maybe preserved as an example of 21st century technology. It will serve as a reminder of an expensive, futile, and environmentally damaging age, when real committal to combating climate change was surrendered to high profit and political gratification.

Its hard to believe some folk cannot see the obvious difference and impact that exists between traditional windmills and 4000-feet-hight turbines.

Anyway, all this does not matter a hoot with regard to planning. What is far more important is the detrimental impact turbines have on wildlife habitats, landscapes, the rural environment and everything within it.

Non operation of local wind factories for long periods of time is now recorded. There are times when there isn't enough generated power for a 60w lamp. It must surely be that this technology doesn't work, is expensive and damaging to the environment.

JOHN STONEMAN

Cambs Environmental and Wildlife Protection

March Road

Welney

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