My fear on turbines

PUBLISHED: 10:36 22 December 2006 | UPDATED: 19:53 01 June 2010

WITH the topic of home power generation gathering pace and interest, I now wish to share my concern about the potential risk to the life and welfare of garden wildlife and the quality of life of nearby residents. Planning applications for industrial turbi

WITH the topic of home power generation gathering pace and interest, I now wish to share my concern about the potential risk to the life and welfare of garden wildlife and the quality of life of nearby residents.

Planning applications for industrial turbines must include an environmental impact study regarding the potential impact on wildlife particularly birds and bats.

It is acknowledged even by the wind industry that badly sited turbines kill birds, and destroy habitat.

The micro turbines in question will normally be installed to the side of the house, the two-metre blade will rotate at 100-1,000 rpm and is open to the elements. It is my belief and that of others the potential risk of blade collision by bird or bat is a reality and a strong possibility.

The rapid flights of lightly framed birds, nest building or feeding their young will possibly be fraught with danger. Indeed it may be a danger echoed nationwide with percing on a rooftop posing a risk to wildlife.

Late evening will see the arrival of bats and owls, as they hunt on the wing, again, all at potential risk, not only from the resident's turbine but the neighbours' too.

Disturbance is very much a reality, as we see farmers place similar types of machines on the land to drive birds away, apart from the obvious danger of high rotating structures. Will this garden mechanisation drive away the wildlife?

Research has shown that, disturbingly, no study or assessment have been undertaken by the developers of this type of turbine in the UK, I do find this appalling given the history of the industrial turbine, and I have now called the relevant bodies who agree with my concerns to look into this.

To do our bit for the environment can only be applauded, but great care must be taken not to do anything that may impact on other residents, or diminish their quality of life.

Whatever your choice, there is little out there that will do the job. Latest research shows that it takes 22 years to pay back your cost of a turbine.

It is better to conserve your energy by turning off lights and pulling the curtains - and it's cheaper.

JOHN STONEMAN

Poplar Farm

March Road

Welney


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