MARCH: Bronze age site discovery adds more substance to the town's history

PUBLISHED: 10:04 02 January 2009 | UPDATED: 11:45 29 April 2010

THE recent discovery of a 4,000 year old site at March adds more substance to the town s history. Then it had no name and over the centuries development took place along the boundary line between two ancient kingdoms, hence the name Merc (Anglo-Saxon) me

THE recent discovery of a 4,000 year old site at March adds more substance to the town's history.

Then it had no name and over the centuries development took place along the boundary line between two ancient kingdoms, hence the name Merc (Anglo-Saxon) meaning boundary.

More than 30 Romano British sites have been discovered at March and within a five mile radius of the town, artefacts for instance brought to light on the site of Davenwear shop in High Street.

In the 18th century a large cache of Roman0-British coins were found in Robingoodfellows Lane, March.

At Flaggrass Hill, north of Creek Road, several artefacts proved that a community existed there in Roman times. A human Romano-British skeleton was discovered when developing Berryfields housing estate.

Further east at Grandford, a small settlement came to light with what appeared to be a small fortification guarding the ancient Fen Causeway, a Romano-British military/commercial road linking Peterborough with the Peddars Way and Brancaster in Norfolk.

The remains of several babies were found at Grandford. They are thought to have died from a severe disease about 2,000 years ago.

March has retained its name from at least the 7th century when it was put on the map by Wendreda, the town's unique saint.

It is thought this woman, a healer and wise counsellor, introduced or re-introduced the Christian faith to March.

She was famously known for her virtuous ways and the translation of her mortal remains to Ely was attended by royalty and high ranking nobles.

Certainly the town has a fascinating and important history. What else remains to be found?

TREVOR BEVIS

St Peter's Road

March


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Wisbech Standard. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Wisbech Standard