FENLAND: Are turbines really the answer?

PUBLISHED: 11:37 26 February 2009 | UPDATED: 08:54 02 June 2010

IT is confirmed, March town will receive yet another wind turbine that will add to the rural industrial clutter that is seen locally on our landscape and skyline, also confirmed at the same time is that those that have supported this rural vandalism have

IT is confirmed, March town will receive yet another wind turbine that will add to the rural industrial clutter that is seen locally on our landscape and skyline, also confirmed at the same time is that those that have supported this rural vandalism have declared that they were wrong in doing so.

A very recent report (The Independent Feb 23) has stated that main green activists in the UK have finally woken up to the fact that "intense lobbying against nuclear power in the 70s and 80s was a campaign that may have caused more harm that good", it now appears that senior environmental campaigners have broken cover and publicly backed nuclear power, among others Stephen Tinsdale, former director of Greenpeace.

Over the past decade I have denounced what I view as a badly flawed and damaging policy of wind power development in rural Britain, my objections to this industrialisation and rural vandalism has been met with a barrage of green hysteria, as accusations of nimbyism and luditism were levelled against my beliefs.

Being anti nuclear was seen to be an essential part of being an environmentalist, however, senior environmentalist now say that nuclear power is needed to combat climate change.

If so called green environmentalists were wrong about nuclear power, they are proberly wrong about their support for wind power and its associated environmental damaging impacts.

Not to be outdone, our local authority ploughs ahead with a mish- mash of inconsistency in wind turbine policy and development, (most recent report costing the taxpayer £24.000), this deplorable ineptitude is creating a curtain of industrial wind turbines in Fenland, councils embracement and support has led to a industrial stampede that is destroying rural landscapes, and in some cases placing the health and safety of residents at risk.

JOHN STONEMAN

Cambs Environmental and Wildlife Protection


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