WISBECH: Visitors to Peckover will soon be able to explore in a new Propagation House

PUBLISHED: 10:26 17 February 2009 | UPDATED: 08:53 02 June 2010

Working on the new orangerie at Peckover House, Wisbech

Working on the new orangerie at Peckover House, Wisbech

Archant © 2009

VISTORS to Wisbech s Peckover House will soon be able to explore a new glasshouse in beautiful gardens at the Victorian property. The first panes of glass were installed in the new Propagation House, which replaces a rotting wooden building which was clos

Working on the new orangerie at Peckover House, Wisbech

VISTORS to Wisbech's Peckover House will soon be able to explore a new glasshouse in beautiful gardens at the Victorian property.

The first panes of glass were installed in the new Propagation House, which replaces a rotting wooden building which was closed to the public six years ago.

It is part of a £150,000 National Trust project which will also see a new heating system installed in the garden's Orangery.

The aluminium frame replacement uses the same footprint as the Victorian original and will be in the same form and dimensions.

Attempts to ensure it is as in keeping with the Victorian house as possible are being made.

Peckover's gardeners will be growing seeds and propagating cuttings from the extensive landscaped gardens in the new greenhouse.

Propagation houses are built into the ground to retain some of the heat and it will have steps leading down to it.

Allison Napier, head gardener, said: "At Peckover we propagate a large percentage of the plants used in the garden. For several years we have had to utilise some of the space in the Orangery for propagation. The new glasshouse will enable us to put back the full decorative display in the Orangery for visitors to enjoy."

The decision to knock down the original and start again was taken when the wooden building, thought to have been altered in the 1950s, showed signs of structural failure six years ago.

Ms Napier said: "We did see if we could repair but too much of the wood was rotten. We would have had to replace 80pc of wood. It wasn't a practical option."

The original Victorian building was built sometime before 1887 and a Fernery, which will not be replaced, was added between 1887 and 1925.

Work should be complete by the summer.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Wisbech Standard. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Wisbech Standard