WISBECH: Mother says ASBO jail sentence for daughter was a cry for help

PUBLISHED: 15:56 06 November 2008 | UPDATED: 08:43 02 June 2010

simone manning mother of asbo liz manning

simone manning mother of asbo liz manning

EXCLUSIVE BY Tom Jackson THE mother of a teenage girl jailed for breaching an anti-social behaviour order says her daughter is crying out for help after witnessing her parents caught up in years of domestic violence. Simone Manning, 38, said that she a

EXCLUSIVE

BY Tom Jackson

THE mother of a teenage girl jailed for breaching an anti-social behaviour order says her daughter is "crying out for help" after witnessing her parents caught up in years of domestic violence.

Simone Manning, 38, said that she and her husband Thomas, 39, have had problems with domestic violence since their daughter Lizzie was a toddler.

"Lizzie has seen a lot of domestic violence between me and my husband and she has been a victim herself," Simone said. "The problem started when she was about two years old.

"She has bottled a lot of the problems up, but will not talk to anyone. She's a girl I feel I cannot reach out to any more, she is crying out for help."

Lizzie, 18, of Wisbech, was handed a two-year ASBO in August, banning her from most of the town centre for committing a catalogue of offences.

However, she breached the ASBO twice within weeks of it being issued when she was caught in a public place with a group of people. Magistrates gave her a three-month prison sentence.

Social services are now working with the family.

Simone said: "We are slowly overcoming the issues and I want Lizzie to get help and get on with her life."

Simone feels she did not fail as a mum, but admits she could have done more to help her daughter through tough times.

She added: "Lizzie's got her faults but so do a lot of people. But I don't think she deserved such a harsh sentence because she is not half as bad as other people on the streets.

"Away from most of her friends you couldn't wish for a better girl. She did anything for anyone and probably still would."

Simone says her daughter would always say she is ok, but felt Lizzie had "a lot of problems stuck in her head and she would not know how to deal with them".

She added: "It is easy to get in this network of mates, where everything is ok and blocks out problems.

"Gradually alcohol came into it and I think it fuelled the problems - most of her trouble seemed to be drink-related."

Simone hopes Lizzie can still achieve her dream of working with children, but said: "If there is anything I can do, I will. I don't want her to hide her problems.


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