Video & Gallery: Giving blood for the first time

PUBLISHED: 16:56 16 April 2008 | UPDATED: 08:25 02 June 2010

To watch our video hover over the image above and click the play button. Adobe Flash Player required.

To watch our video hover over the image above and click the play button. Adobe Flash Player required.

Sharon Kerrison, 32, gives blood for the first time. Sharon s three-year-old daughter Emma-Louise was born with a rare and potentially life-threatening blood disorder called Hereditary Sphercytosis, and owes her life to other donors. WHERE WAS IT HELD? M

sharon kerrison and her daughter emma-louise at her first blood donor session

Sharon Kerrison, 32, gives blood for the first time. Sharon's three-year-old daughter Emma-Louise was born with a rare and potentially life-threatening blood disorder called Hereditary Sphercytosis, and owes her life to other donors.

WHERE WAS IT HELD? March Youth and Community Centre, in Station Road.

WHEN DID IT TAKE PLACE? Friday, April 11 at 2pm.

WHAT WAS INVOLVED? Mrs Kerrison, from Manea, was registered on a computer and a donor health check form, which she had filled out prior to the visit, is checked. She is then taken for a private interview with a nurse and asked further questions to see if she is fit and well to give blood and the nurse answered all queries that Mrs Kerrison had. After this, she lies on a bed and gives her donation. This takes between six and eight minutes. She then spent 10 minutes in the refreshment room having tea and biscuits.

A standard donation is 470 millilitres and donors are invited to give blood every 16 weeks.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE? It takes roughly one hour for anyone giving their first donation and a little less time for further donations.

WHERE DOES THE BLOOD GO? It is taken to Brentwood, Essex. Two deliveries are made a day and the blood must be stored within six hours or it can not be used.

WHO CAN DO IT: Anyone aged between 17 and 59, who weighs more than seven stone 12 pounds and is generally fit and healthy.

ARE THERE ANY RISKS? Gareth Bell, National Blood Services communications officer, said: "Every potential donor is thoroughly checked and there is no risk at all. Donors are told to not do anything too strenuous after giving blood, like going to the gym, but they should be fine to go back to work or carry on there day as normal.

HOW DID IT GO? Mrs Kerrison said afterwards: "I feel absolutely fine and no different to how I did when I came in here. I've persuaded and inspired other friends to give blood and I'll be back for my next donation in August."

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call the National Blood Service Helpline on 0845 7 711 711 or log on to www.blood.co.uk.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Wisbech Standard. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Wisbech Standard