Tributes paid to a thoughtful and energetic Fenland businessman who has died aged 78

PUBLISHED: 10:32 24 March 2010 | UPDATED: 09:35 02 June 2010

Philip Morton who has died aged 78

Philip Morton who has died aged 78

RETIRED March businessman Philip Morton who remained a prominent figure through his work and support of many local organisations has died. Mr Morton who lived in the town all his life and built up the family corn merchants business T Morton and Sons, died

RETIRED March businessman Philip Morton who remained a prominent figure through his work and support of many local organisations has died.

Mr Morton who lived in the town all his life and built up the family corn merchants business T Morton and Sons, died after he lost an eight year battle against illness. He was 78.

His family have paid tribute to him as an "astute, thoughtful and energetic businessman" while also praising his contribution to local schools and charities in March.

A funeral service for Mr Morton will be held at St Peter's Church, March, on Thursday April 1 at 11.15am followed by private interment at Eastwood Cemetery. Donations in lieu of flowers will be for March Educational Foundation.

Mr Morton was married for 47 years to the late Iona who died in 2000. He leaves a son, Chris, daughter, Annabel, son-in-law Mark, brother, Geoff, and two grandchildren Sam and Tom.

His family said: "He was an astute, thoughtful and energetic businessman. Coupled with his keen intellect was a generous heart that enabled him to help countless local people with all manner of problems.

"'No' was never a word in his vocabulary. He was a prominent and vocal figure in the town. He remained a man of people throughout his life."

Mr Morton was educated at March Grammar School and rose to the rank of Sergeant during his National Service.

When he returned he joined his dad, Hubert Morton, and cousin Tony in the family corn merchants firm in Station Road, March. The old corn mill site is now occupied by flats but the name lives on in Morton's Court

The business prospered with Mr Morton's influence and expanded to include silos in Flagrass Hill and a pig rearing operation in Grange Road. On later years the partnership was incorporated and diversified into agrochemicals. Mr Morton remained a director, along with Tony, until the company was sold in 1988.

During retirement Mr Morton was a governor at Neale Wade Community College and a trustee of March Educational Trust Foundation. He was also a key member of March and District Amateur Operatic Society taking on many varied roles from back stage work to principal parts on stage. He was chairman of the society and was president right up until his death.

His family added: "His knowledge of local families and the history of March was remarkable. He lived life to the maximum. Few days went by when he was not socialising with friends or townsfolk in the local pubs of March.


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