‘Be loud and proud of who you are’ - Youth worker and kickboxer from Wisbech nominated for national diversity award

PUBLISHED: 07:00 26 March 2020

Rosie Woolgar (far left) has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIED

Rosie Woolgar (far left) has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIED

Archant

A youth worker and kickboxing instructor from Wisbech has been nominated for a national LGBT award.

Rosie Woolgar has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIEDRosie Woolgar has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIED

Rosie Woolgar, who also works in King’s Lynn, is in the positive role model category at this year’s National Diversity Awards having been nominated by the parent of a child whom she made an impact on from her work with LGBT children over several years.

Rosie works for The Kite Trust, an LGBT charity that helps children and young people who are LGBT or who are questioning their gender or sexuality, and runs one-to-one meetings, three youth groups, and one group to support parents of transgender young people.

“My aim is to show the young people who attend my youth clubs and kickboxing lessons, that it is important to be loud and proud of who you are,” she said.

“That representing yourself is paramount and that LGBT+ people are resilient, powerful, headstrong, and beautiful. That we can achieve change and social justice and that it’s our duty to be unique.”

Rosie Woolgar (left) has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIEDRosie Woolgar (left) has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIED

After suffering recurrent problems with her spine aged nine after damaging it while doing gymnastics, as well as chronic neck and back pain, Rosie has also been the victim of violent crime in Asia where she was volunteering.

Despite living with daily pain, Rosie hasn’t let this stop her from continuing to train and coach kickboxing - progressing to black belt within three years of starting out, before going on to coach two youth clubs and one adult club.

“After being the victim of a mugging in south-east Asia, I was medically evacuated and repatriated back to the UK,” Rosie said.

“Kickboxing was a way for me to make new friends, socialise in a new area, get fit and slowly rehabilitate my injuries.

Rosie Woolgar has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIEDRosie Woolgar has been nominated in the National Diversity Awards. Pictures: SUPPLIED

“It was tough to recover from injury, but when I was back to fighting fit, I sped through the programme and before I knew it I was a part of the coaching Team, became an instructor and most recently have opened my own franchise.”

Rosie, who works as a programme manager for an LGBT+ youth charity in her day job has a strong interest in public sector work, fuelled by joining the Youth Parliament in Southend as a youngster.

Supporting those such as LGBT people, refugees and those with mental health issues, she has also had to juggle a busy personal life, but this has not let Rosie stop trying to make an impact.

“In my personal life I am a carer and activist. I have undertaken a great deal of voluntary work, including campaign work that advocates social reform,” she said.

“I approach my personal and working lives with positivity as well as determination, always making the most of opportunities I seek and circumstances I find myself in.

“I derive satisfaction from roles in which I can build strong and fruitful working relationships with others and have a positive impact on communities and organisations.”

Those that have nominated Rosie have spoken highly of her, believing that there is no other worthy winner of the award.

“Rosie is an incredible human. She gives hope to those who feel hopeless and a voice to those who haven’t been heard,” one said.

What sets Rosie apart is “her stunning ability to turn her amazing values into action” according to one person, while another believes her hard work “will no doubt do great things in the future”.

Working tirelessly while having a variety of roles has allowed Rosie rise to prominence in the local community, and there’s one main aim she wants those who work with her to achieve.

“My aim is to show the young people who attend my youth clubs and kickboxing lessons, that it is important to be loud and proud of who you are,” she said.

“Representing yourself is paramount and that LGBT+ people are resilient, powerful, headstrong, and beautiful. That we can achieve change and social justice and that it’s our duty to be unique.”

To vote for Rosie or to learn more about her, go to https://nationaldiversityawards.co.uk/nominate/28563/.

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