Queen's School has 'improved little'

ATTENDANCE remains a major problem at the Queen s School, Wisbech, and is still well below national averages and overall has improved little , concludes a team of Government inspectors. The rate of attendance of those students who have English as an add

ATTENDANCE remains a major problem at the Queen's School, Wisbech, and is still well below national averages "and overall has improved little", concludes a team of Government inspectors.

"The rate of attendance of those students who have English as an additional language has declined steadily over the current year," says the report. "It is below the school's own low figure and so is cause for particular concern."

But there are many signs, conclude OfSTED inspectors, that the school is slowly emerging from the crisis that engulfed it a year ago.

A new study carried out earlier this month reveals the school - about to come out of 'special measures' once it becomes the Thomas Clarkson Community College- is anticipating an increase in the number of students gaining five A* to C grades a GCSE.


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And there is now "a greater proportion of good teaching than has been evident on previous visits by inspectors. The proportion which is inadequate remains unacceptably high, thought evidence from the school's own accurate lesson observation data, shows that it is reducing."

The inspectors also note that students told them that teaching is better and they are pleased with the greater variety on offer.

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But the quality of homework is still too inconsistent, says OfSTED, and overall the amount and quality contributes to, rather than reduces, students' underachievement."

This was the final OfSTED visit prior to the new college opening on September 1. Inspectors said the management team was providing strong leadership and direction. "It has implemented some important strategic changes to strengthen the school and has worked to good effect to improve the recruitment of new teachers and leaders.

Overall, inspectors said progress at the school since being placed in 'special measures' was satisfactory; and progress since the previous monitoring inspection was also satisfactory.

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