Planning permission needed for pond

PUBLISHED: 17:33 01 May 2007 | UPDATED: 20:01 01 June 2010

A WOMAN who studies rare breeds of geese and ducks has been told she must have planning permission for the pond she keeps them in. Wildlife enthusiast and smallholder Julia Harland has learned that she must have planning consent for both the pond and summ

A WOMAN who studies rare breeds of geese and ducks has been told she must have planning permission for the pond she keeps them in.

Wildlife enthusiast and smallholder Julia Harland has learned that she must have planning consent for both the pond and summerhouse she built at her Elm home.

Her agent, David Afford, has told Fenland District Council's planners that Mrs Harland has, for a long time, kept rare breeds of geese and duck.

"Having lost several birds over the years, she decided that this was not an ideal environment to not only keep the birds but to breed them and study them."

Mr Afford said Mrs Harland decided that part of the paddock at May Cottage, Wales Bank, "would be ideal to create an environment more suited to the natural habitat of the birds, and therefore the pond was formed".

He has now applied for retrospective permission for both the pond and summerhouse on the 100 metres-by-45 metres site, which originally formed part of three paddocks.

Mr Afford said his client was in the process of studying and compiling data on the red breasted miniature geese which do not breed well in this country. "It is hoped that by providing as natural conditions as possible, they will be encouraged to breed," he said. "This work involves being on site a good deal of time but not visible which is why the summerhouse was erected to face the pond."

Mr Afford said the summerhouse is a timber building with a felt roof "and as such could be classified as a temporary building rather than a permanent structure".


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