Odour experts brought in to investigate cannabis smell wafting across the Fens and Norfolk

PUBLISHED: 19:23 04 July 2017

MP Liz Truss holds a meeting with British Sugar at Wissington about cannabsi smellsr eported across the Fens and Norfolk . Photo below: Elizabeth Truss MP touring the Cornerways Nursery with British Sugar Managing Director Paul Kenward, Downham Market and Stoke Ferry councillors PHOTO:MP  Liz Truss

MP Liz Truss holds a meeting with British Sugar at Wissington about cannabsi smellsr eported across the Fens and Norfolk . Photo below: Elizabeth Truss MP touring the Cornerways Nursery with British Sugar Managing Director Paul Kenward, Downham Market and Stoke Ferry councillors PHOTO:MP Liz Truss

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An environmental specialist and odour consultant have been brought in to investigate a smell wafting across the Fens and Norfolk that may be coming from a legal cannabis factory.

British Sugar at Wissington grows the plants for the pharmaceutical industry and in June they harvested their first crop since switching from growing tomatoes.

However, complaints have come in from across the region about the smell that seems to be spreading for miles.

South West Norfolk MP Liz Truss met with parish councillors and British Sugar bosses to raise the issue.

She said:‘The recent harvest of the specialist crop was the first one to come from Cornerways Nursery, near Wissington and with the process generally taking about four to five weeks, there is the potential for strong smells to linger for quite a few days.

“British Sugar have assured me that they do not want to create any problems for local residents and I certainly want to see any changes, where needed, implemented as quickly as possible.

“I think everyone recognises the importance of the work done at the factory but it should not adversely impact on the surrounding towns and villages, subsequently I have asked British Sugar to keep me updated on developments.”

Specialists have been brought in and if needed “investment will be made in appropriate odour control equipment,” she added.

Representatives from Stoke Ferry Parish Council and Downham Market Town Council joined Ms Truss in a meeting with the managing director of British Sugar, Paul Kenward.

Discussions focused on the strong smells and concerns have been raised that a possible source might be the operation.

In 2016 a decision was made by them to switch from growing tomatoes to plants for the pharmaceutical sector.

The plant is a member of the cannabis family and is used in the drug Epidiolex, which is reported to have positive results in the treatment of childhood epilepsy.


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