OBITUARY: Wisbech character Cyril Fisher dies aged 94

PUBLISHED: 16:42 07 January 2009 | UPDATED: 08:50 02 June 2010

CYRIL Fisher, one of Wisbech s great characters, has died at the Langley Lodge Residential Home aged 94. A funeral service was held yesterday (Thursday) at St Leonard s Church, Leverington. After a short spell as an errand boy for Billy Burnham Greengroce

CYRIL Fisher, one of Wisbech's great characters, has died at the Langley Lodge Residential Home aged 94. A funeral service was held yesterday (Thursday) at St Leonard's Church, Leverington.

After a short spell as an errand boy for Billy Burnham Greengrocery shop in Bedford Street, Mr Fisher joined the Gabriel Wade and English Sawmill (later to become English Brothers, Montague Meyer and Jewson) in 1929. He became an accomplished wood machinist and profile grinder.

Including his war service, he worked at the dockside sawmill for around 65 years, finally retiring at the age of 80 when he took up a part time job as a picture framer.

Mr Fisher volunteered for the RAF in the Second World War and was a technician with Bomber Command.

After the war he returned to Wisbech and his job at Gabriel Wade and English. He joined the St John Ambulance Brigade and it was while helping at the North Cambs Hospital that he met his wife of 57 years, Joan, who was a nursing sister.

Joan now lives at the Chestnuts in Wisbech but in more recent years the couple lived in Leverington.

Mr Fisher became well known, not only for his work, but for his love of ballroom dancing and also his efforts to help others. Among the many good causes he worked for are the Lynn Hospital League of Friends (helping Joan to run the shop for many years), Save the Children, Salvation Army, Octavia Hill Society, RAFA and Help the Aged.

Mr Fisher's son, Paul said: "He was a regular fixture on the streets of Wisbech, known by thousands of Fen folk for his good humour, abundant energy and the fact that he cycled everywhere. He only gave his cycle up last year, grudgingly, after it returned home with him in the back of an ambulance once too often.


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