Neighbouring council to Fenland rejects wind turbine on flicker, ice and intrusiveness grounds

PUBLISHED: 16:08 10 August 2009 | UPDATED: 09:11 02 June 2010

A LONG-running campaign to build a wind turbine at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King s Lynn has been dealt another blow by councillors. The latest application to build an 80m turbine in the hospital grounds has been refused by West Norfolk s developmen

A LONG-running campaign to build a wind turbine at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn has been dealt another blow by councillors.

The latest application to build an 80m turbine in the hospital grounds has been refused by West Norfolk's development control board, despite a recommendation for approval by officers.

This is the second planning application for the turbine which has been turned down.

Earlier this year a planning inspector overturned an appeal against the council's first refusal in May 2008, on the grounds there was missing data about the impact the turbine would have on birds.

But Ecotricity argues that Natural England has no objections to the proposals put forward in the latest application.

"As you can imagine we are a bit disgruntled by this decision but sadly not surprised, and so are now considering our options," the firm said.

"The planning committee were advised by their own legal team that due to the existing ruling on this application by the planning inspectorate, if it is approved at appeal Ecotricity are very likely to get costs from the council.

"It is disheartening that at a time when we are all looking to save money a project that is being created to save QEH money on their fuel bills so that more can be spent on patient care could end up costing the same taxpayers if costs are awarded and all due to the fact that the elected few did not follow their own expert's advice."

Vice-chairman of the development control committee, Mick Peake, said the latest plan had been turned down by councillors because of the impact of flicker from the turbine, intrusiveness to the countryside and the danger of ice falling from the sails.

The campaign to build the turbine started in August 2006 when proposals were put forward by the hospital to cut power costs in a bid to help the hospital with a financial turnaround.


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