Mum backs campaign to teach children road safety after her son, 7, was killed in Fenland crash

PUBLISHED: 11:16 23 March 2020 | UPDATED: 11:16 23 March 2020

Alice Husband (right) is backing a charity campaign to teach children basic road safety after her son, 7, was killed in a Fenland crash in 2014. Picture: Supplied/Archant Archive

Alice Husband (right) is backing a charity campaign to teach children basic road safety after her son, 7, was killed in a Fenland crash in 2014. Picture: Supplied/Archant Archive

Archant

A mum whose son was killed in a Fenland crash five years ago is backing a charity campaign to teach young people basic road safety.

Seth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant ArchiveSeth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant Archive

Seven-year-old Seth Dixon was killed by a driver using a hands-free phone as he crossed the road near his home in Tydd Gote in December 2014.

His mum, Alice, is now doing everything she can to teach children about road safety and has supported a one-day event teaching 29,000 two to seven-year-olds the basics.

The ‘Beep Beep! Day’, organised road safety charity Brake in collaboration with Aardman’s Timmy Time and Churchill Insurance, took place on Wednesday, March 18.

Mrs Husband said: “The Beep Beep! Day that Brake is running is a great way of teaching young children about road safety and hopefully helps keep them safe on the roads.

Alice Husband. Picture: Archant ArchiveAlice Husband. Picture: Archant Archive

“My son Seth was killed crossing the road and I couldn’t bear for anyone else to have to suffer the loss of a child in a road crash.”

An inquest in 2016 heard that Seth was crossing the road outside his home in Tydd Gote, near Wisbech, to post a letter when the tragedy occurred on December 5, 2014.

He died from head injuries after he was hit by Amy Asker’s green Ford Mondeo as he crossed a road outside his home.

Ms Asker, 33, was fined £90 after admitting a charge of careless driving rather than the more serious offence of causing death by dangerous driving when she appeared before magistrates.

Seth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant ArchiveSeth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant Archive

The inquest into Seth’s death heard that Ms Asker had been talking on the phone to a friend using its loud speaker when she hit Seth – known locally as Smiler.

At the time, Mrs Husband said she had ‘forgiven’ Ms Asker for making an ‘innocent mistake.”

She said: “I don’t blame her (Asker) for what happened, It was an innocent mistake that led to tragic circumstances.

“I’ve forgiven her and I want to remember Seth for the smiley, happy, much loved little boy that he was.”

Seth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant ArchiveSeth Dixon, of Tydd Gote, died when he was struck by a car being driven by a woman talking on her mobile phone in 2014. Picture: Archant Archive

Research by Brake revealed that drivers overwhelmingly support young children, aged 7 and under, learning about road safety at school and nursery.

A survey of 2,000 drivers found that 9 in 10 agree that it is important for young children to learn about road safety.

Young children are amongst the most vulnerable road users. On average, 10 children aged 7 and under are killed and seriously injured on Britain’s roads every day, according to Department for Transport.

Samuel Nahk, senior public affairs officer for Brake, said: “Anyone who has or works with young children will tell you how wonderful they are at absorbing new information and wanting to share that with anyone who will listen.

“Children are never too young to start learning about road safety – something which most drivers agree is important. These vital messages will stay with them for life.

“This project gives them a voice to call on grown-ups to use roads safely too and ensure we can all enjoy safe and healthy journeys, wherever we live.”

Lucy Brooksbank, head of marketing at Churchill Insurance, said: “We are very proud to have supported Brake and its Beep Beep! Day since the very beginning.

“The wide range of resources made available to those participating not only makes this a fun day, but a day that makes a difference and hopefully saves lives.

“Too many children die or are seriously injured on our roads each week. Beep Beep! Day is a great way of starting to talk to young children about road safety, as well as raising awareness among drivers, including parents and grandparents, of the need to drive with extreme care when young children are about.”


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