It’s a store draw!

PUBLISHED: 13:00 25 August 2006 | UPDATED: 19:47 01 June 2010

Action from the Asda-Tesco charity match - Pic: PETER UPTON

Action from the Asda-Tesco charity match - Pic: PETER UPTON

IT may not quite have been Culloden, the last great battle to be fought on British soil some 260 years ago, but Gorefield 2006 came a close second. And whereas it took only 60 minutes to quash the Jacobite rebellion at Culloden, it took a full 90 minutes

IT may not quite have been Culloden, the last great battle to be fought on British soil some 260 years ago, but Gorefield 2006 came a close second.

And whereas it took only 60 minutes to quash the Jacobite rebellion at Culloden, it took a full 90 minutes for Tesco and Asda to slog it out on the village playing fields.

As needle matches go this had everything - cut price wars, store discounts, customer share and market penetration.

Observers also added, as the two teams lined up for a charity football match, there was the little matter of the Great Wisbech Pancake Race of 2002 to be considered. On that occasion, an over-confident Asda runner tripped and dropped his pancake near the finishing line, as a runner from Tesco went on to secure top honours for the store.

On Sunday, it was a case of survival of the fittest as two teams from the rival stores fought for supremacy.

"It was a no-holds-barred contest," said Chris Ferguson of Asda, who watched the drama unfold. "People were being knocked flat on the ground, and the day after there were quite a few people nursing bumps and bruises."

Malcolm Spriggs was match referee "and, surprisingly, he didn't book anyone or send anyone off," said Mr Ferguson.

"If there was a chance of getting a goal, it was as if all hell had broken out. It was a great match, though, and everyone shook hands at the end.

"Tempers were a bit frayed - after all, if you're not match-fit and someone knocks you flat, you are going to get a little cross."

The match ended in a 2-2 draw, and the money raised will go to Sightsavers International to aid blind people in South Africa.


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