In truth this BBC documentary is a grubby little film that does us no service whatsoever

ANYONE who has suffered the indignity, the stresses, the misery and, quite often the financial ruin caused by unemployment will not be impressed by Evan Davis grubby little film about Wisbech and the Fens. As a stunt in social engineering it may have its

ANYONE who has suffered the indignity, the stresses, the misery and, quite often the financial ruin caused by unemployment will not be impressed by Evan Davis' grubby little film about Wisbech and the Fens.

As a stunt in social engineering it may have its moments of poignancy and touch the outer skin of reality for a few, but for most it will be remembered as the day the BBC came to town and stitched us up.

For only a moment do we see the hardship of a family facing possible eviction because of a father's difficulty in finding employment but that is quickly washed over as we encounter a handful plucked from the dole queue to be offered jobs in a factory, picking asparagus or trying to serve up culinary masterpieces at an Indian restaurant.

The hopelessness and helplessness of those taking is nothing more than mickey taking on a grand scale and even when two workers begin to feel good about themselves by working well in a potato factory, there is little light at the end of the tunnel. Told they could apply for jobs, we hear from a voice over they had indeed applied to work there but their applications had been turned down.


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Once again Fenland has been tricked, and not in a pleasant way.

Next time a film crew calls, tell them you're out.

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