Fenland man complains to Queen Elizabeth Hospital about treatment after wound infection

A FURIOUS hospital patient has accused nurses of poor treatment after he suffered an infection from stitches in a wound. Daryl Ward had surgery at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King s Lynn to treat long-lasting bladder problems. But his brother Jamie sa

A FURIOUS hospital patient has accused nurses of poor treatment after he suffered an infection from stitches in a wound.

Daryl Ward had surgery at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn to treat long-lasting bladder problems.

But his brother Jamie said an out of hours GP discovered stitches around his wound which, they claim, should have dissolved.

The brothers have now made an official complaint to the hospital after he contracted an infection in his bladder and in the wound.


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Jamie also described hygiene in the hospital as "appalling" and said: "The NHS need to look very closely at the state of this hospital. I do not want any of my relatives treated there ever again.

"Daryl is distressed by everything that has happened. I wouldn't have taken the complaint this far if I didn't have serious concerns."

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Daryl was first admitted to Queen Elizabeth Hospital and had a suprapubic catheter - a tube inserted into the bladder to help pass urine - fitted in 2007. However, he suffered from abdominal pains following the procedure.

He was admitted back to Queen Elizabeth Hospital in March this year with abdominal pains. A new catheter was inserted.

Jamie claims Daryl was told his stitches were dissolvable, but an out of hours GP found stitches around his wound a couple of weeks later.

Jamie also claims the hospital nurse had a "rude manner" when he asked questions.

A spokesman for Queen Elizabeth Hospital said: "We are looking into this. In the meantime, if Mr Ward and his family have any questions regarding his medical treatment they should discuss them with his consultant or with their GP.

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