FENLAND: Crown Court murder trial hears evidence of father screaming at baby to stop crying

Murder Trial – Day Two The father of a baby girl who died with septic adult bite marks on her face was heard  screaming at her to stop crying just four days before she was rushed to hospital, a court heard today. Leeya Akinrele was just seven weeks old wh

Murder Trial - Day Two

The father of a baby girl who died with septic adult bite marks on her face was heard screaming at her to stop crying just four days before she was rushed to hospital, a court heard today.

Leeya Akinrele was just seven weeks old when she died of a massive head injury with 20 broken ribs.

Medical examinations after her death revealed that Leeya suffered a broken thigh bone, fractures around her knees on both legs, and bites from adult humans to her face and hands.


You may also want to watch:


Engineer Peter Williams was called to the home of her parents, Olusola Akinrele, 33, and Kelly Inman, 21, on December 14 to fix the central heating.

He later told police investigating the death that he had seen a baby wrapped in a blanket in the living room and it did not stop crying during the hour he was in the house.

Most Read

He also heard Mr Akinrele shouting at Miss Inman to ''Shut it up'' or ''Shut up'' because of the incessant crying, Cambridge Crown Court was told.

Mr Williams, who was upstairs working in the airing cupboard when he heard the shouting, said: ''All the time I was there the baby was crying. It was a very strong cry - more of a scream.

''He was shouting rather loudly. It was an agitated and aggressive tone of voice.

''As I recall it was something like 'Shut it up' or 'Shut up'. They were words to that effect.''

Midwife Susan Squibb had helped deliver Leeya at Peterborough District Hospital on November 7 2006 before paying mother and child a home visit on November 13.

Mrs Squibb said she found it strange that Inman, who was 19 at the time, had no family or friends with her when she gave birth.

She said: ''Kelly was not accompanied by anybody when she gave birth. There were no family or friends with her.

''It was quite unusual. Usually if there is not a partner or family member, there is a friend or neighbour.''

The court heard that Leeya's birth had been ''hard work'' but when Mrs Squibb visited the family at home both mother and daughter appeared normal.

She said: ''I examined Leeya. She was a normal healthy baby."

''It was lovely to see there were no concerns at all. Having delivered her I was quite excited about meeting up with her again.''

Mrs Squibb, who described the couple's home as ''clean and tidy and quite appropriate'', said she did not see Mr Akinrele, but Miss Inman spoke of him in affectionate terms.

She said: ''There was the remains of a meal in the kitchen. She pointed out he had been really good, and cooked her a lovely meal.''

Following Mrs Squibb's visit, health visitor Christine Fuller made an appointment to visit Leeya and Miss Inman at home on November 20, but found no one in when she arrived.

The visit was rescheduled for November 24 and Mrs Fuller, who has 30 years experience as a health visitor, said Leeya appeared fine but Miss Inman was suffering some physical problems.

Mrs Fuller said: ''Mentally she was very well and she was coping very well but she did have some physical problems that needed attention.

''On that day at that time baby Leeya was in good health. She had gained seven ounces which is extremely good.''

Miss Inman's physical problems were large blood loss, irritable bowel syndrome, of which she had a history, pain in her right side, iron deficiency anaemia and loss of urinary control.

Mrs Fuller recommended Miss Inman see her GP, and told the court that because the baby appeared well, it was normal for the next visit to be scheduled around six weeks later.

Mothers could take their infants to a baby clinic in Whittlesey for check-ups, but they were not compulsory.

Inman and Akinrele both deny the murder of their daughter Leeya, who died on December 30 2006, 12 days after she was taken to hospital, when her life support machine was switched off.

Akinrele also denies causing or allowing the death of a child. Inman denies causing the death of a child, but has pleaded guilty to allowing the death of a child.

The trial, which is expected to last at least six weeks, continues.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter