FENLAND: College will open as usual, despite teachers' strike

PUBLISHED: 10:52 21 April 2008 | UPDATED: 08:25 02 June 2010

college of west anglia, isle campus

college of west anglia, isle campus

COLLEGE WILL OPEN AS USUAL, DESPITE TEACHERS STRIKE WISBECH: The College of West Anglia says it will open as usual on Thursday at both its Fenland and King s Lynn sites despite a one day teachers strike. The University and Colleges Union (UCU) an

COLLEGE WILL OPEN AS USUAL, DESPITE TEACHERS' STRIKE

WISBECH: The College of West Anglia says it will open as usual on Thursday at both its Fenland and King's Lynn sites despite a one day teachers' strike.

The University and Colleges Union (UCU) and the National Union of Teachers (NUT) have called a one-day strike over the 2008-09 pay claim.

However, a college spokesman said: "We expect to operate all scheduled teaching at all campuses on the day and, unless otherwise advised, students should turn up for lessons as usual.

"A number of the college's teaching staff are members of UCU but plans are in place to prevent significant disruption to teaching.

Principal, David Pomfret, said "Although we recognise the need for salaries to remain competitive, we are disappointed that UCU has called its members out to strike even before national pay negotiations for this year have begun. However, we are confident that students will not be adversely affected by this action."

TWELVE SCHOOLS IN CAMBRIDGESHIRE SET TO CLOSE AS PART OF TEACHERS' STRIKE

CAMBS: Dozens of schools will close when teachers stage their first national strike for 21 years on Thursday, it has been reported.

The Guardian has polled local authorities on how many schools could be affected by the walkout over pay.

Twenty-five were able to give concrete figures and revealed 136 would close for the day.

The worst affected areas will be Suffolk and Cheshire with 28 closures each, the newspaper says.

Twelve will close in Cambridgeshire, 10 in Bedfordshire and nine in Brighton and Hove.

In March Neale Wade Community College will be closed on Thursday as part of a nationwide teacher's union strike. However GCSE students may still be able to attend.

Other schools are expected to function as normal, but this could change in the coming days.

NEALE-WADE WILL CLOSE FOR STUDENTS IN YEARS SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE AND TEN

MARCH: Tim Hitch, principal of Neale-Wade, today issued the following statement in relation to the teachers' strike:

"As other teaching staff cannot cover classes for striking colleagues, regrettably I am going to close the College for students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 on April 24th 2008. It is expected, however, that all students will return to College on Friday 25th April, and attendance will be monitored particularly carefully on that day.

"Year 11 students should attend College as normal. When their scheduled teacher is unavailable, I will expect students to make use of the revision facilities and coursework catch-up process that will be provided in the College.

"Year 12 and 13 lessons will continue to be taught as normal unless a member of staff is absent due to industrial action. Students will be made aware of this in advance.

"Lunch will be provided as normal. Please accept my apologies for any difficulties caused by the above arrangements."

TEENAGER INJURED IN TWO-VEHICLE COLLISION ON A1101

TYDD ST MARY: Emergency services were called to the A1101 at Tydd St Mary, at about 10.55pm on April 19 where a grey Fiat Punto was in collision with a red Jaguar E-Type.

The 17 yr old man from Wisbech who was driving the Fiat was taken to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn for treatment to injuries which are not reported as life threatening. The driver of the Jaguar was not reported injured.

LIB DEMS: CLASS SIZES IS ONE OF "BROWN'S BROKEN PROMISES"

CAMBS: Commenting on figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, that nearly three-quarters of Cambridgeshire primary schools have 30 or more pupils per class Lib Dem campaigner Jonathan Chatfield commented:

"The National Union of Teachers' Cambridgeshire spokesman is right to draw attention to the fact that this is one of Gordon Brown's broken promises.

"We would find the money to reduce class sizes from scraping the wasteful Child Trust Fund and redirect future money allocated towards it, some £1.45 billion over a Parliament, into allowing schools to reduce class sizes for the under 11's.

"We are the only ones who aim to reduce class sizes for children at the start of their education.

"We are the only party with specific plans to raise standards in all schools and will guarantee a good education at your local school, no matter who you are or where you live."

TWO 30FT HIGH TREES CUT DOWN AT PUB

WISBECH: Two 30ft high trees have been cut down at the Bowling Green pub. The incident took place some time between Sunday, March 30 and Wednesday, April 9.

Pc Mick Graves, who is looking into it, said: "It amounts to criminal damage as the owners of the brewery did not give their permission for these trees to come down."

• Anyone with any information is asked to call Pc Graves, at Wisbech police station, on 0845 456 4564.

TWO MEN ARRESTED AFTER POLICE SEIZE COUNTERFEIT £20 NOTES

CAMBRIDGE: Two 23-year-old men have been arrested after £25,000-worth of counterfeit £20 notes were seized when police raided a house in Cambridgeshire.

The men have been arrested and bailed to return to a police station on May 14.

MP BACKS CANCER RESEARCH'S 'SCREENING MATTERS' CAMPAIGN

SOUTH HOLLAND: South Holland & The Deepings MP John Hayes, is backing Cancer Research UK's campaign 'Screening Matters', which aims to raise awareness of cancer screening and help increase the uptake of services.

Mr Hayes is calling on the Government, the NHS and our local health trust to further improve the availability and take up of screening services in our area and across Lincolnshire.

Mr Hayes said: "There is no doubt that cancer screening saves lives. Thousands of women are alive today thanks to breast and cervical screening, while the new bowel cancer screening programme for men and women has the potential to save many thousands more. But we also know that even more lives could be saved if the NHS gets a greater number of eligible people into screening programmes and makes a number of cost-effective improvements.


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