FENLAND: Artist's impression of the multi-million pound unit that will produce green power is reveal

PUBLISHED: 15:52 05 February 2009 | UPDATED: 08:53 02 June 2010

Proposed building at Fenmarc

Proposed building at Fenmarc

THIS is the artist s impression of a multi-million pound anaerobic digestion plant unit heading to Fenland, which will use waste food to create enough electricity for 1,500 homes. The green energy plant – which will employ up to 15 people - will be run by

Proposed building at Fenmarc

THIS is the artist's impression of a multi-million pound anaerobic digestion plant unit heading to Fenland, which will use waste food to create enough electricity for 1,500 homes.

The green energy plant - which will employ up to 15 people - will be run by a division of Lifecrown Investments Ltd.

If approval is given it will be built behind the vegetable packing factory of Fenmarc, a sister company, off the A141 at Westry, March.

Mark Harrod, chairman of parent company Lifecrown, described it as the company's "biggest ever capital project."

Potato waste from Fenmarc and food waste from other companies will be diverted from landfill into the AD plant where it will be turned into gas to fuel the engines that will create electricity.

Nick Waterman, director of a newly-formed subsidiary Local Generation Ltd, said that the aim was for the plant to be odour free and its design and construction would ensure all waste is processed in a sealed environment.

The new plant will occupy a 100-metre by 60-metre site and tanks will be no higher than 15-17 metres. Residents will get the chance to view the proposals at a special open day.

A new website has also been set up by Local Generation and will explain their plans in more detail.

Mr Harrod said: "Our view is that if we secure the funding for this, we will never build it cheaper than we will in the next 18 months.

"The cost of money is relatively cheap and I have built my business on borrowing, not a dirty word but a great way to grow a business. Borrowed money, used responsibly, can create opportunities and returns and I can't think of better conditions presenting themselves in my lifetime."

Lifecrown, which employs some 750 people and enjoys a £100million-a-year turnover, believes the new plant "ticks all the right boxes".

He said: "This project addresses two of today's most pressing problems, climate change and food waste management. By treating energy as a precious resource we can maximise its value.


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