Deputy manager of Wisbech shop threw his career away when he stole £2,000, court told

PUBLISHED: 15:46 24 March 2010 | UPDATED: 09:35 02 June 2010

THE deputy manager of a Wisbech shop threw his career away when he stole £2,000 from the store s safe and then tried to cover his tracks by falsifying financial records. And on Tuesday James Jackson was warned that he could be sent to jail for stealing

THE deputy manager of a Wisbech shop "threw his career away" when he stole £2,000 from the store's safe and then tried to cover his tracks by falsifying financial records.

And on Tuesday James Jackson was warned that he could be sent to jail for stealing the cash from the Savers store in the Horse Fair.

The 22-year-old had used the stolen cash to pay off some of his debts - and trying to woo his ex-girlfriend back.

Appearing at Wisbech courthouse on Tuesday, 22-year-old Jackson admitted two charges of theft and two charges of false accounting.

The first theft came to light in early January, when internal auditors reported that £1,000 was missing, said prosecutor Andrea Fawcett. The area manager was informed, and the loss was put down to computer error.

But when another £1,000 went missing from the safe, an internal investigation was launched.

It was discovered that cash was removed on December 31 and February 17, and handwritten records had been altered.

"The defendant admitted taking the two sums of £1,000 and adjusting the paperwork," said Ms Fawcett.

"When the police were called he was arrested, and admitted taking the two amounts, and falsifying the records to cover up the offence.

"He said he had become desperate over mounting debts. Most of the money had gone on discharging his debts, although a small amount was spent on his ex-girlfriend in an attempt to woo her back."

Mitigating, Andrew Spence said Jackson had moved into a flat with his girlfriend, and he bought items for their new home on credit cards.

Jackson, of Ranworth, King's Lynn, was left with debts of £6,000 after the couple split up.

"He was receiving final demands and had extended his overdraft to its limit," said Mr Spence.

"There was no degree of sophistication in the thefts; he did not try to conceal who had done the banking. He was candid about how he threw his career away by his stupid crimes.


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