Parish councillor quits in Upwell over three year row with fellow councillor about ‘a piece of rail’

PUBLISHED: 10:35 18 January 2019 | UPDATED: 11:12 18 January 2019

A Upwell parish councillor has resigned after 10 years following a row with another councillor about a “piece of rail”. Picture: GOOGLE IMAGES

A Upwell parish councillor has resigned after 10 years following a row with another councillor about a “piece of rail”. Picture: GOOGLE IMAGES

Archant

A parish councillor has resigned after 10 years following a row with another councillor about a “piece of rail”.

Frank Humm, 80, of Upwell Parish Council, said over the past three years he had the “misfortune” to witness events that he concluded breached the councillors’ code of conduct.

But he says an argument with another councillor that was the final straw.

Mr Humm claimed that a fellow councillor had been questioned by a member of the public about obtaining a piece of rail from the railway for a local history project.

However, when the matter was aired at a council meeting, Mr Humm said that the councillor denied that he had ever been asked about it.

“I was the only one who really picked up on this and got it brought before the parish council three times” he said.

“It escalated and we had three meetings over a few months but everyone gave me a lot of aggravation and the attitude was he was a councillor so it was ok.

Mr Humm, who won an award for his Speedwatch campaign, decided enough was enough and quit.

He said: “It was just out of order and I was always being told not to say anything when I spoke up. I felt like I was always being cut off and put in the corner.”

Council chairman Prue Lester said they were “very grateful” for Mr Humm’s work.

“The parish council has done all they can to resolve the issue and we have followed the advice given,” she said.

“He was always one to speak his mind and we are very grateful for the work he did for the community over the years.”

Mr Humm sent a letter about his resignation to this paper in which he said the parish council had declined the opportunity to “rectify” the issues of which he had complained.

“This is not what a council should do, it is not what I signed up for and it is not what I can condone,” he wrote.

“I have always tried to remember why I became a councillor; my aim was to help the electorate, not own them.”


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