Campaigners enjoy sunlight as trees are cut down

PUBLISHED: 09:11 04 March 2008 | UPDATED: 08:22 02 June 2010

Before the leylandii trees were chopped down.

Before the leylandii trees were chopped down.

BY Louise Hughes WORKERS have started chopping down towering leylandii trees which have cast shadows over homes for 20 years. Campaigning neighbours in Anderson Close, Leverington were enjoying the breakthrough of natural sunlight into their gardens as 12

After the leylandii trees were chopped down.

BY Louise Hughes

WORKERS have started chopping down towering leylandii trees which have cast shadows over homes for 20 years.

Campaigning neighbours in Anderson Close, Leverington were enjoying the breakthrough of natural sunlight into their gardens as 12-metre tall trees were cut.

After trying to sort the problem by negotiating with the owner, they approached Fenland District Council for help.

Barry Bennett and his partner Kate Barnes are among residents enjoying the breakthrough of natural sunlight in their garden.

And last month enforcement action was taken, with the council agreeing to take on the work themselves and sending workers in last week.

The trees surround the property of "Fenways", in Sutton Road, Leverington, owned by Neville Young.

Resident Kate Barnes has lived in Anderson Close with her partner Barry Bennett since July 2006.

She said: "After almost two years of campaigning, it is such a relief to see the trees coming down. It was worth the effort.

"If there is anyone out there with a similar problem, our situation shows that it does pay to be persistent.

"Success is possible with publicity from local press - such as the Wisbech Standard - and help from your local councillor. Ann Carlisle, our councillor at the time, was brilliant."

Gwen and Lionel Worby, who have lived in Anderson Close for 20 years, said: "We have never experienced natural sunlight like this and before we needed a light on constantly in our kitchen. It makes our home seem so different."

In July, an Anti-Social Behavioural Order was enforced on Mr Young and the case went to Fenland's planning committee last month.

But as 'no appeal was lodged within the initial period and no attempts have been made to reduce the height of the hedge' by Mr Young, it was recommended councillors gave the work the go-ahead.

Mr Young was unavailable for comment at the time of publication but he told campaigners in a letter that the trees measured more than 30 feet tall in 1980 - when the homes were being built.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Wisbech Standard. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Wisbech Standard