Nature has moved bunnies on

I WOULD like to reply to last week s letter from M Archer, posing the question: Where have all the bunnies gone? I am afraid I can provide the answer. I was one of the original campaigners in the Save Our Bunnies campaign gathering some 1,800 signatur

I WOULD like to reply to last week's letter from M Archer, posing the question: "Where have all the bunnies gone?"

I am afraid I can provide the answer. I was one of the original campaigners in the 'Save Our Bunnies' campaign gathering some 1,800 signatures in support of the rabbits remaining, and over the years I have continued to keep a watchful eye on their welfare.

In late summer last year I noticed some rabbits were being run over. Closer observation revealed rabbits standing motionless, some close to the edge of the roundabout, their ears down and their coats shabby, apparently oblivious of their surroundings.

I suspected myxomatosis and called the RSPCA to investigate.


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Sadly, a return call confirmed this was indeed the case. The RSPCA officer explained she had managed to capture three rabbits and had been forced to destroy them. However, she observed several more diseased animals flee into the burrows where she could not access them, effective sealing the fate of the whole colony.

So I am deeply sorry to confirm that the bunnies have finally gone.

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In my original campaign I commented that it was for nature to move them on and not the council. Shamefully, nature was simply no match for the legacy of human intervention.

CAROL HAWKINS

Sefton Avenue

Wisbech

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