Wisbech charity shop opening vintage room catering for lovers of 1920s to 1970s clothing

10:17 12 March 2014

The Hospice shop. Union Street. Wisbech. Manager Jane Brown getting ready for the opening of the Vintage clothes and accessories room. Picture: Steve Williams.

The Hospice shop. Union Street. Wisbech. Manager Jane Brown getting ready for the opening of the Vintage clothes and accessories room. Picture: Steve Williams.

Archant

Fans of vintage clothing are in luck as a Fenland charity shop is set to open its own specialist room later this month.

The Hospice shop. Union Street. Wisbech. Picture: Steve williams.The Hospice shop. Union Street. Wisbech. Picture: Steve williams.

The Bishop of Ely will be present when The Hospice Shop, of Union Street, Wisbech, unveils its vintage section on March 21.

Shoppers will be able to get their hands on both men’s and women’s clothing from the 1920s to the 1970s.

There will be dresses, hats, gloves, bags and other accessories in stock.

Manager Jane Brown said: “There is a big following for vintage clothing with clubs and societies putting on events like 1940s themed nights.”

The Norfolk Hospice provides care, comfort and compassion to those in our community nearing the end of their lives and to their families and friends.

The store is desperate for more stock. You can deliver items to the shop or they can do collections. For more information, call 01945 466527.

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